A Florida man bought a Lamborghini Huracán EVO, Rolex watches and designer clothes from fake pandemic loans

Valesky Barosy, 27 (pictured) has been charged with five counts of wire fraud, three counts of money laundering and one count of aggravated impersonation.

Federal prosecutors have charged a 27-year-old Haitian immigrant with fraud after he used ill-gotten COVID relief money to buy millions of luxury items such as a Lamborghini Huracán EVO, designer suits and designer watches. Rolex and Hublot.

Valesky Barosy, 27, applied for more than $4.2 million in Paycheck Protection Program loans, falsifying his prior year expenses, net income, payroll and IRS tax forms in each request, according to the Department of Justice.

He was paid around $2.1 million.

On December 29, Barosy made his first appearance in federal trial court to face five counts of wire fraud, three counts of money laundering and one count of aggravated impersonation.

If found guilty, he could face a prison sentence of up to 132 years.

Valesky Barosy, 27, flaunted his ill-gotten wealth on social media.  He was fraudulently paid $2.1 million in Paycheck Protection Program loans, Justice Department says

Valesky Barosy, 27, flaunted his ill-gotten wealth on social media. He was fraudulently paid $2.1 million in Paycheck Protection Program loans, Justice Department says

On social media, Barosy has draped himself in Louis Vuitton, Gucci and Chanel, portraying himself as a success story with captions such as

On social media, Barosy draped himself in Louis Vuitton, Gucci and Chanel, portraying himself as an achievement with captions such as “from homeless man to breathtaking view of skyscrapers” and “you don’t have need to be awesome to start”. , start being awesome’

On social media, Barosy draped himself in Louis Vuitton, Gucci and Chanel, portraying himself as an achievement with captions such as “from homeless man to breathtaking view of skyscrapers” and “you don’t have need to be awesome to start”. , start being awesome.’

He claimed that when he moved to the United States four years ago he could not afford shirts from Walmart, where he was employed as a storekeeper.

He became president of a company known as VBarosySolutions Inc., or VBS, according to the federal indictment, which he says helped clients fix bad credit scores.

“4 years ago I was broke, busted and disgusted,” he wrote in a post. “I couldn’t even afford to put gas in my car or even buy a dollar menu at McDonald’s.”

“I remember being cursed by a cashier at McDonalds just because I didn’t have the extra 50 cents for a sweet and sour sauce. And today, thanks to our hard work and determination, we are featured in top publications like ABC, FOX, etc.

Barosy's nebulous online biographies cast the fraudster as a '7-figure entrepreneur', 'NFT creator' and 'marketing and e-commerce' expert

Barosy’s nebulous online biographies cast the fraudster as a ‘7-figure entrepreneur’, ‘NFT creator’ and ‘marketing and e-commerce’ expert

One of Barosy's self-published 'press releases' was titled 'How This Haitian Entrepreneur Went From Walmart to Disrupting the Multi-Million Dollar Credit Repair Industry'

One of Barosy’s self-published ‘press releases’ was titled ‘How This Haitian Entrepreneur Went From Walmart to Disrupting the Multi-Million Dollar Credit Repair Industry’

His nebulous online biographies portray the fraudster as a “7-figure entrepreneur”, an “NFT creator” and an expert in “marketing and e-commerce”.

One of the “press releases” he produced was titled “How This Haitian Entrepreneur Went From Walmart To Disrupting The Multimillion-Dollar Credit Repair Industry.”

Barosy bragged about being involved with Financial Education Services Inc., a company the Georgia Attorney General has described as an “illegal credit repair business” that uses “illegal and deceptive practices in its marketing structure to several levels”, according to the Miami Herald.

This company paid a $1.75 million fine to the state of Georgia for its practices before changing its name to United Wealth Education.

Since the enactment of the federal Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act on March 29, 2020, a slew of fraudsters have abused the financial assistance provided by the PPP.

Nearly $100 billion has been stolen from COVID-19 relief programs set up to help businesses and people who have lost their jobs due to the pandemic, the US Secret Service has said, based on data from the Department of Labor and the Small Business Administration.

Barosy, pictured, could face up to 132 years in prison if found guilty

Barosy, pictured, could face up to 132 years in prison if found guilty

South Florida, the nation’s top fraud capital, led the wave of financial crime, the Miami Herald reported.

These deceptions included a businessman buying a $318,000 Lamborghini with PPP money, a nurse who lied about her business to buy a Mercedes-Benz lease, and child support with her $474 payment. $000 and a North Miami couple who pretended to be farmers to steal $1 million in benefits.

The COVID-19 Fraud Enforcement Task Force was established on May 17, 2021 with the goal of combating relief fund fraud.


Source link

About the author